Life Without Plastic

Life Without Plastic In Thailand

I was a soldier stationed in Bangkok, Thailand back in the early 1970's. Not constantly having a bunch of loan, I used to eat food from the regional street vendors. Many of my meals were served covered in either a banana leaf or yesterday's paper. Some meals were even served off of unclassified military documentation that was recovered from the rubbish.

Nowadays, all over in Thailand the vast bulk of street suppliers serve food and drink in plastic bags. McDonald's has nothing on this junk food experience.

Whatever you order, be it a rice or noodle meal, is scooped up into a plastic bag and then sealed with a rubber band. This likewise includes soups and drinks.

Smaller sized bags of spices and sauces are also provided. You can even get fresh chopped fruit to enter a small bag with a skewer to stab each sweet morsel.

Shopping on the shopping malls, markets, and streets will also expose you to bags and bags of plastic. It doesn't matter exactly what the size of the item, it will enter a plastic bag.

I have had many events where I got a large plastic bag to hold a range of posts and each successive purchase led to a small plastic bag being taken into the larger. Regardless of my objections that the smaller sized plastic bag was not required, I was turned away with a baffled look and a smile.

Needles to say, after a day or two in Thailand, you tend to acquire a pile of plastic bags. I do manage to utilize a couple of them for filthy laundry or to keep items separated, but many of the plastic goes straight into the trash.

I actually do not know what the Thai individuals would do today without plastic bags. If the tree-hugging ecologists ever came to Thailand, they wouldn't understand exactly what to do.

  • Where would they put their sticky rice and beef jerky?
  • How would suppliers offer coke to go?
  • How would the bootleg software and DVDs be distributed?
  • How would I get my bowl of Thai soup house?
  • Would they be able to revert back to banana leaves and yesterday's newspapers?

I do not believe that the Thai individuals could live without plastic bags. And any effort to stop the use would result in dreadful results.

I was a soldier stationed in Bangkok, Thailand back in the early 1970's. Not constantly having a bunch of cash, I used to eat food from the regional street suppliers. Many of my meals were served covered in either a banana leaf or the other day's paper. Some meals were even served off of unclassified military paperwork that was recovered from the rubbish.

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